9/2/22 FROM THE INTRODUCTIONS OF 18TH CENTURY BOOKS, PART 2

Good morning!  We’re returning to the quotes from Sir Isaac Newton’s OBSERVATIONS UPON THE PROPHECIES OF DANIEL, AND THE APOCALYPSE OF JOHN from 1733:

“With the opinion of the first Commentators agrees the tradition of the Churches of Syria, preserved to this day in the title of the Syriac Version of the Apocalypse, which title is this: THE REVELATION WHICH WAS MADE TO JOHN THE EVANGELIST BY GOD IN THE ISLAND PATMOS, INTO WHICH HE WAS BANISHED BY NERO THE CAESAR…This opinion is further supported by the allusions in the Apocalypse to the Temple and Altar, and holy City, as then standing;” 

I need to remind us here that John was on Patmos, visiting heaven when the Temple and Altar were mentioned, and not in Jerusalem, so to say that this reference indicated that the Temple still stood because John was to literally measure it, is not valid.  It disturbs me that Newton didn’t figure this out. 

“…and to the Gentiles, who were soon after to tread under foot the holy City and outward Court.”

The treading referred to went on for centuries…up to this minute, despite the return of the Israelites to Jerusalem. And it will no doubt continue for the time being.

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8/29/22 FROM THE INTRODUCTIONS OF 18TH CENTURY BOOKS ON REVELATION, PART 1

Good morning! I’ve got a fair amount of material from the 18th century, I’ll be looking to pare it down a bit, but it’s still going to take more than one post. 

Let’s start with Matthew Henry. Probably you know his big Bible commentary, but he wrote more on Revelation than is in my copy of MATTHEW HENRY’S COMMENTARY. Here’s the intro:

The Book of the Revelation of St. John consists of two principal divisions. 1. Relates to ‘the things which are,’ that is, the then present state of the church, and contains the epistle of John to the seven churches, and his account of the appearance of the Lord Jesus, and his direction to the apostle to write what he beheld, ch. 1:9–20. Also the addresses or epistles to seven churches of Asia. These, doubtless, had reference to the state of the respective churches, as they then existed, but contain excellent precepts and exhortations, commendations and reproofs, promises and threatenings, suitable to instruct the Christian church at all times. 2. Contains a prophecy of “the things which shall be hereafter,” and describes the future state of the church, from the time when the apostle beheld the visions here recorded. It is intended for our spiritual improvement; to warn the careless sinner, point out the way of salvation to the awakened inquirer, build up the weak believer, comfort the afflicted and tempted Christian, and, we may especially add, to strengthen the martyr of Christ, under the cruel persecutions and sufferings inflicted by Satan and his followers.” 

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