11/5/22 FROM THE INTRODUCTIONS OF 21st CENTURY BOOKS ON REVELATION

I have 22 books published in the 21st century; we’ll look at 6 of these.

We’ll start with Adrian Rogers (1931-2005). He was a conservative pastor in several successive American Southern Baptist Churches, starting in his home state of Florida and ending in Tennessee. He was president of the SBC denomination on three different occasions and helped move it into a more conservative stance in the late 70’s and 80’s. Mr. Rogers was also a broadcast minister: he started Love Worth Finding in 1987, and it is still running today on 2500+ radio stations and translators, as well as television stations across America and in 194 countries of the world. 

The book we will be looking at is called UNVEILING THE END TIMES IN OUR TIME: THE TRIUMPH OF THE LAMB IN REVELATION, published in 2004. From Chapter 1:

“Revelation is a book of prophecy…Have you ever wondered why the psychics who peddle their gifts on cable television never win the lottery? And even the weatherman can only make an educated guess concerning the weather…A prophet of God is right 100 percent of the time.

“This is not to say that we live an aimless life because we don’t know tomorrow’s details. Not at all. God’s plan for us is not a roadmap but a relationship. He knows the future and we know Him, and that’s enough. It is our lack of knowledge of day-by-day detail that keeps us closer…How much better to walk through life holding the hand of the One who knows the way and cares for us!

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11/1/22 FROM THE INTRODUCTIONS OF 20TH CENTURY BOOKS ON REVELATION, PART 5

This is the last post on the 20th century. We’ll start with John F. Walvoord’s book THE REVELATION OF JESUS CHRIST: A COMMENTARY, published in 1987.

From the Introduction, on the Authorship, Occasion, and Date:

“The opening verses of the book of the Revelation plainly claim the book was written by John, identified almost universally in the early church as the Apostle John. The apostolic authorship of the book has, nevertheless, been questioned ever since the time of Dionysius of Alexandria in the third century…Beginning with Dionysius those who object to Johannine authorship or to inclusion of the Apocalypse in the canon have tended to magnify the problems of grammar and alleged inaccuracies. Impartial scholarship has admitted  that there are expressions in the book of Revelation which do not correspond to accepted Greek usage, but this problem is not entirely confined to this book of the Bible. Conservative scholarship has insisted that infallibility in divine revelation does not necessarily exclude expressions which are not normal in other Greek literature and that such instances do not mar the perfection of the truth that is transmitted…When due allowance is made for the character of the book…there are remarkable similarities in some respects between the Fourth Gospel and the book of Revelation…

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