10/10/2022 FROM THE INTRODUCTIONS OF 20TH CENTURY BOOKS ON REVELATION, PART 2

Good morning all. We will start today with a quote from a book entitled REVELATION by Harry A. Ironside (1876-1951). He was born in Toronto; his father died of typhus at age 27 when Ironside was 2 years old; at the age of 10 his family moved to Los Angeles. He could find no Sunday School to attend, so he started his own at age 11. According to Wikipedia, he and his friends sewed burlap bags together to make a tent, and then taught about 60 children each week. He left school after graduating eighth grade, worked as a cobbler and then as photographic assistant, but preached with the Salvation Army in the evening. At age 16 he became a full-time preacher with the Salvation Army. At 18 his health began to fail, so he stopped his busy preaching circuit to recuperate. He moved to San Francisco where he became associated with the Plymouth Brethren. He ended up as pastor for the Moody Church in Chicago, with 2 honorary PhDs.

Here’s a quote from the Preface of REVELATION, published in 1921:

“Heretofore I have always refused to bring out a volume on the Apocalypse, as it seemed to me there were so many already in print better than any I could hope to write. But while this fact remains as true today as ever, the great war and other colossal movements of the past five years have combined to so emphasize and clarify much that abler brethren had written in years gone by, that it now seems to me there is a need for some later exposition of the last prophetic book of the bible which would take cognizance of these many significant events.

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9/28/22 FROM THE INTRODUCTIONS OF 19TH CENTURY BOOKS ON REVELATION, PART 3

Good morning! We’re still here, so today we will start with Benjamin Wills Newton (1807-1899), an English evangelist. When John Nelson Darby left the Anglican Church, he didn’t start his own group, he actually joined Newton’s congregation at Plymouth Church, later to be known as the Plymouth Brethren. 

We have a short quote from his THOUGHTS ON THE APOCALYPSE published in 1853:

It seems wonderful, that any, who reverence the Scripture and know what true Christianity really is, should be able to persuade themselves, that the history of the world has been one of progress in righteousness and in the knowledge of God.” 

I love this quote because I really agree with it. Indeed, how could someone who is a Bible-believing Christian look back at history and get any idea from it that the world is “progressing in righteousness?” It is plainly not, as the next writer clearly demonstrates.

The next writer is Charles John Vaughn (1816-1897), an English scholar and Anglican churchman. This gentleman was the headmaster of an English boys school in the mid-1800’s. He resigned precipitously and no one knew why until the 1970’s. At that point a diary turned up from one of the students of that time, stating that Vaughn was having a relationship with one of his young (non-school) friends…while at the same time Vaughn was having boys flogged for homosexual behavior. The student reported the relationship to his father, and his father basically blackmailed Vaughn into resigning. Vaughn was unable to take any further position of leadership in the Church until the man blackmailing him died; the boys maintained their silence. It can be hoped that Vaughn changed his behaviors, but, the young man in question was the person who took care of Vaughn’s papers after his eventual death.

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